Disruptive Behavior

Disruptive behavior and misbehavior can occur in any classroom. If a teacher understands the needs of the student, the effect of the environment on the student, and identifies behavior patterns, it is easier to identify ways to provide support, reinforce positive behaviors, redirect behavior, and prevent a disruptive behavior from occurring in the future. The use of PBIS and other research-based strategies can be used to address and manage behavior and can create a learning environment that is safe and encourages students to engage in meaningful learning and interaction.

Understanding roles

When working with students with exceptionalities, it is important to understand the roles of various members of the special education team. Administrators, paraprofessionals, service providers (such as a speech, occupational, and physical therapists), teachers, and school nurses can all be members of this group, depending on the individual needs of the student. Understanding the role of each person during the IEP process and providing students with services in an educational setting is an integral part of instructing students with disabilities. This ensures their needs are being met within the requirements of the law and that the students and families are receiving appropriate support and resources.

Disability Comprision Template

As part of the IEP team, general education teachers and special education teachers must possess an understanding of the eligibility categories used to determine whether a student is eligible to receive special education services. General education teachers and special education teachers must collaborate and communicate in a professional and articulate manner with school psychologists, related service providers, administrators, colleagues, and families when determining eligibility for special education services and providing a rationale to support the need for delivery of services.