Final IAL Proposal



In this assessment, submit your final IAL proposal. Remember, your IAL proposal is the culmination of all of your work in this class and in your program of study. This proposal should be a demonstration of the knowledge and expertise you have gained, and it should be well organized and concisely written. In the business environment, people do not generally have time for flowery language or documents that take forever to get to the point. Your proposal should be direct and clear and cover all outlined areas.

Reflection and Next Steps
As you worked through your project, you gained new information through research and a hands-on approach. This likely resulted in a re-evaluation of and adjustment to your original thoughts and ideas about your proposal. As you revise and prepare to submit your final project proposal, write a reflection in which you address the following questions:
What are the biggest areas of change from your initial project ideas about your project to your final project proposal?
What key information caused you to change your approach?
What are the most important things you have learned so far in creating your final project proposal?
What is the most important takeaway for you from your experience in the integrated action learning project that you might apply to a future project in your field?
What do you hope to do with the knowledge you have developed in this class and your program of study?
Is there any advice you would give to someone starting this course or starting the BS IT program?
Final Proposal Submission
Once you have completed the reflection, compile the following components into a single, cohesive executive communication document that is your project proposal. Refer to the Integrated Action Learning Project description linked in the Resources under the Required Resources heading and to Assessments 1–5 for specific information on each component.Note that the components in the project proposal that have already been assessed will not be assessed again but still must be included in the final document.
Executive summary.
Organization and site supervisor selection.
Environmental scan.
Literature review.
Self-assessment and description.
Action learning process summary.
Solution(s) analysis.
Needs and risk analysis.
Legal, ethical, and policy analysis.
Reflection.
To properly cover the information outlined in the project proposal that you have been working with throughout the course, your project proposal will be ten to twelve pages long and should include at least ten resources cited in proper APA style.
Additional Requirements
Formatting: Format resources according to APA (6th edition) style.
Written communication: Your writing should be free of errors that detract from the overall message.
Criteria Non-performance Basic Proficient Distinguished
Communicate effectively in business environments.
Does not communicate effectively in business environments or use an appropriate selection of tools in connection to the proposal. Communicates effectively in business environments. Communicates effectively in business environments, identifying tools in connection to the proposal. Demonstrates advanced levels of business communication, using a variety of appropriate tools in connection to the proposal.
Use IT tools for decision making.
Does not identify IT tools for decision making. Identifies IT tools for decision making. Uses IT tools for decision making. Demonstrates an understanding of using IT tools for decision making, using a variety of appropriate tools in connection to the proposal.
Collaborate using IT tools in an organization.
Does not collaborate using IT tools in an organization. Collaborates using IT tools in an organization, demonstrating a fundamental understanding of general plans for collaboration within the environment. Collaborates using IT tools in an organization. Demonstrates understanding of specific plans for collaboration within the environment with the goal of addressing the problem in connection to the proposal.
Solve loosely defined problems with technology solutions.
Does not solve loosely defined problems with technology solutions. Solves loosely defined problems with vague technology solutions in connection to the proposal. Solves loosely defined problems with technology solutions. Demonstrates understanding of problems in the environment and includes specific technology solutions in connection to the proposal.
Understand ethical, legal, and policy issues associated with IT.
Does not identify ethical, legal, and policy issues associated with IT. Identifies ethical, legal, and policy issues associated with IT. Understands ethical, legal, and policy issues associated with IT. Demonstrates understanding of ethical, legal, and policy issues specific to the environment in connection to the proposal.
Create IT solutions to solve organizational problems.
Does not create IT solutions to solve organizational problems. Creates IT solutions to solve general organizational problems. Creates IT solutions to solve organizational problems. Demonstrates understanding of specific organizational problems and develops IT solutions that effectively address them in connection to the proposal.
Plan strategically for global and domestic environments.
Does not plan strategically for global and domestic environments. Plans strategically for global and domestic environments but does not demonstrate an understanding of the action research environment and global/domestic environmental factors. Plans strategically for global and domestic environments. Demonstrates understanding of the connection between the action research environment and global/domestic environmental factors in connection to the proposal.
Design and model effective IT solutions for an organization.
Does not design and model effective IT solutions for an organization. Designs and models effective IT solutions for an organization that generally address the problems identified. Designs and models effective IT solutions for an organization. Demonstrates understanding of the development of IT solutions that address the problems identified, effectively using IT principles connected to the proposal.
Reflect on learning processes in designing and modeling IT solutions.
Does not reflect on learning processes when designing and modeling IT solutions. Lists elements of learning processes when designing and modeling IT solutions. Reflects on learning processes in designing and modeling IT solutions. Reflects on learning processes and describes connections between learning processes and the development of project proposals.
Communicate in a manner that is professional and consistent with expectations for members of the IT profession.
Does not communicate in a manner that is professional and consistent with expectations for members of the IT profession. Communicates in a manner that is at a graduate level and consistent with expectations for members of the IT profession. Communicates in a manner that is professional and consistent with expectations for members of the IT profession. Demonstrates advanced levels of communication that are scholarly, professional, and consistent with expectations for members of the IT profession.


requirements
school Proposal school Final IAL Proposal

Organization and Site Supervisor Selection



The focus of this assessment is discovering where the needs of the IAL project environment connect with what you have learned in your program and in your own experience. The goal is for you to identify an organization and site supervisor for your project and to work with your site supervisor to identify an area of need in the environment that will become the focus of the rest of the course as you develop a project proposal to address this need.

Organization and Site Supervisor Selection
The first step in your project is to identify an organization and a site supervisor who will work with you. In some action learning and research circles, there is a person called a "critical friend" who serves a similar role. Essentially, you will be looking for someone who is connected with your target organization who can help you by not only being a sounding board but also by serving as an insider to help you find the information you need. Ideally, this person would also be involved with helping change happen in areas targeted by your project.Your site supervisor will be vital in the most critical phase of your project—the discovery phase—during which you will investigate critical issues you will need to consider when designing your project proposal for the organization you have chosen.A site supervisor serves a key role in understanding the pulse of an organization. This person can be critical in helping you identify key stakeholders you may need to involve in your planning process and in facilitating collaborative dialogue around potential solutions. At this time, select someone within the organization that you have chosen for your project. This person should be:
In a position to facilitate change on a fairly broad level within the organizational environment.
Willing to devote his or her time to this project.
Responsible for an area within the environment that is related to your course of study, or that encompasses an area related to your course of study.
Willing to participate in and support this project.
Once you have selected a site supervisor, create a short description of this person that includes the following. You will include this description in your environmental scan document.
Basic contact information.
The site supervisor's role and length of time with the organization.
How you contacted or met this person.
Relevant information about the person and his or her role that may be important.
Environmental Scan
As you will begin laying the groundwork for developing your project proposal, the first step of this process is to examine the environment that will serve as the context for your project. An environmental scan provides an initial analysis of key internal and external factors affecting the organization to identify critical problems that might be addressed by IT solutions.
SWOT Analysis
The structure you will use for this scan is called a SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis. Using SWOT, first look at the strengths of the environment, organization, or industry that you are analyzing. Second, examine weaknesses in that same environment. After you spend time looking at the internal strengths and weaknesses of the target environment, look at the opportunities and threats the target environment faces.Designing appropriate IT solutions strategies requires that you consider a combination of those four factors, two internal to the organization (factors that the organization has control over or that result from its own actions) and two external influences (factors that the organization is experiencing as a result of another organization or outside influence).The SWOT analysis should provide a clear picture of the organization, industry, or environment that includes information about resources, people, cultural factors, plans, and problems. The goal of gathering this information is to provide a basis for you and your site supervisor to talk about areas that could be addressed by your project. Once you have decided on a problem or area you wish to improve in the environment, the rest of the project can proceed from there.At this time, conduct a SWOT analysis of the organizational environment you have identified for your project. Create a document up to three pages long that summarizes the most important findings of your analysis. Also include a description your site supervisor's (critical friend's) role in the environment.
Project Charter
A project charter is a document that contains sections detailing project business case, project objectives, a summary schedule, a summary budget, project success criteria, and other pieces of information. For this part of the assessment, complete the following:
Research the process of creating a project charter.
Write a paragraph or two that discusses the intersection between what you discovered in the SWOT analysis and the requirements for a project charter.
Remember: In this project, you are the central figure. This is about the culmination and blending of all of your learning and experiences so far and creating change in an environment through the change of your own practice and the deepening of your own understanding of key issues. Do not forget to include yourself in this picture.
Additional Requirements
The format of your environmental scan document should be of your own choosing. Your completed environmental scan document should include the following components:
Site supervisor description.
Introduction to the organization and current situation.
Identification of the problem, issue, or improvement area chosen.
SWOT analysis.
Description of the intersection between a SWOT analysis and a project charter.
Conclusions based on the SWOT analysis.
Criteria Non-performance Basic Proficient Distinguished
Collaborate with a site supervisor to identify an IT project subject.
Does not identify the site supervisor and his or her role in the environment. Identifies the critical site supervisor and his or her role in the organizational environment. Collaborates with a site supervisor to identify an IT project subject. Includes a detailed description of the site supervisor, his or her role in the environment, and his or her relationship to various aspects of the environmental scan.
Provide a thorough environmental scan that details problems in the environment.
Does not provide an environmental scan that details the problems in the environment. Lists elements of an environmental scan that details the problems in the environment. Provide a thorough environmental scan that details the problems in the environment. Provides a thorough environmental scan that details the problems in the environment and draws further conclusions.
Describe the intersection between a SWOT analysis and a project charter.
Does not list the intersection between a SWOT analysis and a project charter. Lists the intersection between a SWOT analysis and a project charter. Describes the intersection between a SWOT analysis and a project charter. Analyzes the intersection between a SWOT analysis and a project charter.
Research the process of developing a project charter.
Does not identify the process of developing a project charter. Identifies the process of developing a project charter. Researches the process of developing a project charter. Researches the process of developing a charter and makes recommendations for improved charter elements using examples from research.
Communicate in a manner that is professional and consistent with expectations for members of the IT profession.
Does not communicate in a manner that is professional and consistent with expectations for members of the IT profession. Communicates in a manner that is at a graduate level and consistent with expectations for members of the IT profession. Communicates in a manner that is professional and consistent with expectations for members of the IT profession. Demonstrates advanced levels of communication that are scholarly, professional, and consistent with expectations for members of the IT profession.

2 days ago
requirements
school Organization selection school Site Supervisor Selection description 1 pages, Double Spacing

Project Analysis



For this assessment, write a report for your selected organization's integrated action learning project containing a solutions analysis, a needs and risk analysis, and a legal and ethical analysis. Compile these three analyses into a report.
Solutions Analysis
This analysis addresses key questions related to your proposed solutions to your IT problem. The result should be a one- to two-page summary that answers the following questions:
What solutions do you propose?
How do your solutions address the specific organizational problems that you have identified, and how do they address the key stakeholder concerns?
How are the solutions connected to global or domestic (or both) IT trends and solutions?
How does what you are proposing keep the organization in line with what is happening in the industry?
What model or architecture do you propose for your solution (or solutions)?
What technology or technologies do you recommend as part of the solution?
What are the specific IT principles that support your proposed solution?
What are key issues that the organization needs to consider from a legal, ethical, and policy standpoint?
What are risks associated with the solution (or solutions) proposed, and how might they be minimized?
Needs and Risk Analysis
This analysis specifies how the proposal's solutions meet the needs of the organization and key stakeholders, and it identifies the potential risks involved as well as strategies for addressing those risks.When considering a possible course of action, an organization will ask two key questions:
Does the solution meet the organization's and key stakeholders' needs?
What are the potential risks to the organization, and how might they be minimized?
A needs analysis helps answer the first question, determining whether a solution measures up against key areas of concern to an organization. A risk analysis addresses the second question. It explores the potential risks of adopting the solution and helps decision makers strategize ways of minimizing, or even avoiding, potential damages to the organization.Write a two- to three-page needs and risk analysis for the solution or solutions you have proposed. The analysis should answer the two questions above, addressing critical issues in the organizational context and stakeholder needs. A risk matrix would be a good addition to the risk analysis portion of this document.In addition, address the following questions:
What are some barriers to the project you have encountered in your analysis? How might you adjust your proposal to address them?
What insights or advice would you give to someone who is working on a similar area for the first time? How can he or she be better at identifying risks and more effective in managing or avoiding potential risks?
Legal, Ethical, and Policy Analysis
Conduct a thorough analysis of the legal, ethical, and policy issues that could affect your IT project. The result should be a one- to two-page summary that answers the following questions:
Are there any legal issues specific to the action learning environment that you should consider?
What areas of your project proposal could have an ethical implication? What are you doing to address these ethical issues, both in reality and in the perception of those involved?
What are the policies in the environment that relate to your project proposal? Are there any areas of your proposal that could be a potential conflict with existing policy in the environment?
Criteria Non-performance Basic Proficient Distinguished
Analyze proposed solutions for a selected IT project.
Does not identify proposed solutions for a selected IT project. Identifies proposed solutions for a selected IT project. Analyzes proposed solutions for a selected IT project. Analyzes proposed solutions for a selected IT project, relates solutions to the larger IT industry, and draws conclusions about the effectiveness of solutions.
Analyze the needs for a selected IT project.
Does not identify the needs for a selected IT project. Identifies the needs for a selected IT project. Analyzes the needs for a selected IT project. Analyzes the needs for a selected IT project, relates the needs to the larger IT industry, and uses examples from research.
Analyze the barriers for a selected IT project.
Does not identify the barriers for a selected IT project. Identifies the barriers for a selected IT project. Analyzes the barriers for a selected IT project. Analyzes barriers for a selected IT project, proposes methods for overcoming barriers, and predicts outcomes from barrier removal.
Analyze the risks for a selected IT project.
Does not identify the risks for a selected IT project. Identifies the risks for a selected IT project. Analyzes the risks for a selected IT project. Analyzes the risks for a selected IT project, relates the risks to the larger IT industry, and discusses risks using research literature.
Analyze legal, ethical, and policy issues that could affect a selected IT project.
Does not identify legal, ethical, and policy issues that could affect a selected IT project. Identifies legal, ethical, and policy issues that could affect a selected IT project. Analyzes legal, ethical, and policy issues that could affect a selected IT project. Analyzes legal, ethical, and policy issues that could affect a selected IT project and evaluates solutions using examples from research.
Communicate in a manner that is professional and consistent with expectations for members of the IT profession.
Does not communicate in a manner that is professional and consistent with expectations for members of the IT profession. Communicates in a manner that is at a graduate level and consistent with expectations for members of the IT profession. Communicates in a manner that is professional and consistent with expectations for members of the IT profession. Demonstrates advanced levels of communication that are scholarly, professional, and consistent with expectations for members of the IT profession.


requirements
school project analysis school Solution Analysis description 1 pages, Double Spacing

Action Learning



For this assessment, complete a self-assessment narrative, develop a lifelong learning and development plan for a selected IT profession, and write a summary that describes action learning.
Self-Assessment
Your self-assessment should represent a thorough assessment of what you offer when it comes to your project, as well as how personal factors might affect the success of your project. The result of your self-assessment should be a one- to two-page narrative that describes you as the person who is at the center of the integrated action learning project. If others were to read your narrative, they should be able to get an idea of who you are, what kind of leader you are, and how you fit into the overall project. You may want to consider personal aspects such as the following:
Relevant work experience.
Coursework in this program.
Career goals.
Special training or education.
Strengths and weaknesses.
Beliefs about leadership.
Beliefs about change.
Beliefs about communication.
Beliefs about lifelong learning.
Additional information that may affect the success of your project.
Lifelong Learning and Professional Development Plan
Lifelong learning is the key to your continued growth and success within your IT profession. Look over the list below of possible ways to continue your professional development and lifelong learning. This list is not exhaustive. How do you plan to continue your learning and development after you graduate from this program? Why do you see it as important? Develop a lifelong learning and professional development plan for a selected IT profession.
Take ownership for one's own personal and professional status and growth.
Define personal professional goals that support lifelong productivity and satisfaction.
Regularly self-assess personal growth and challenges to achieving personal goals.
Achieve development planned to reach personal goals.
Seek out mentors to support and challenge future growth and development.
Be active in professional organizations and groups.
Pursue additional education and possibly higher degrees (Davis & Beyerlein, 2005).
Action Learning
How would you define "action learning"? As the person in charge of your IAL project, what is your role in the action learning process? Consider the following, and write a summary in which you describe "action learning" and the role a project leader plays in it.
Communication: How have you used business communication and tools in developing the project proposal?
Decision Tools: What IT tools have you used in developing the proposal and in collaborating during the planning process?
Collaboration: Reflect on the role of collaboration in developing your proposal.
Who did you work with to accomplish the planning in the environment, and how did your connection with them help shape your proposal?
How has feedback from your site supervisor or critical friend contributed to the development of your proposal?
Reflective Learning: Consider the value that your educational and personal background brought to the process. (See your self-assessment.)
How has your learning process in your program at Capella contributed to your approach to developing your final project proposal?
How have other aspects of your background helped or potentially hindered your work on this proposal?
What lessons have you learned from this process that you would apply to future planning pursuits in your field?
Reference
Davis, D. C., & Beyerlein, S. W. (2005). Development and use of an expert profile. Retrieved from http://www.ee.uidaho.edu/ee/power/jlaw/COURSES/CAP...

Criteria Non-performance Basic Proficient Distinguished
Develop a self-assessment narrative in relation to an IT proposal.
Does not identify aspects of a self-assessment in relation to an IT proposal. Identifies aspects of a self-assessment in relation to an IT proposal. Develops a self-assessment in relation to an IT proposal. Develops a self-assessment narrative in relation to an IT proposal and makes connections between personal factors and project success.
Develop a lifelong learning and professional development plan for a selected IT profession.
Does not identify opportunities to pursue lifelong learning and professional development for a selected IT profession. Identifies opportunities to pursue lifelong learning and professional development for a selected IT profession. Develops an appropriate plan for lifelong learning and professional development to ensure success in the rapidly evolving IT field. Analyzes a highly effective plan for lifelong learning and professional development to ensure success in the rapidly evolving IT field.
Define action learning and the role a project leader plays in it.
Does not define action learning and the role a project leader plays in it. Defines action learning but does not identify the role a project leader plays in it. Defines action learning and the role a project leader plays in it. Demonstrates significant understanding of the role a project leader plays in action learning.
Communicate in a manner that is professional and consistent with expectations for members of the IT profession.
Does not communicate in a manner that is professional and consistent with expectations for members of the IT profession. Communicates in a manner that is at a graduate level and consistent with expectations for members of the IT profession. Communicates in a manner that is professional and consistent with expectations for members of the IT profession. Demonstrates advanced levels of communication that are scholarly, professional, and consistent with expectations for members of the IT profession.
requirements
school learning school action description 2 pages, Double Spacing

Research Literature Review



A literature review allows your recommendations to be informed by the experience of others. To complete a literature review for your integrated action learning project, you will devote significant time to researching your IT issue, beginning with sources that have addressed problems similar to those in your project.Developing a literature review outline means that you will need to go through the work of finding, reviewing, and organizing resources. However, you will not have to go through the additional work of writing them into a formal research section of your paper.Follow these steps to create a literature review:

Gather a solid body of research in the area of the IT problems you have identified for your final project. You may start with broad secondary sources such as textbooks, Google Scholar, or Information Please. Your goal, though, is to harvest a number of potentially useful sources that are called primary sources. These are articles in which the data is actually part of a project or case study being covered. This data is considered more valuable and reliable because it is first-hand data. It is recommended that you set aside a block of two to three hours to gather as many potential articles as you can. Do not read or review them at this time—just gather as many as you can. You should have at least ten resources for your literature review.
Read and process the articles you gathered, looking for common themes or solutions to the problems you are working on. These themes will become the structure for your literature review outline.
Write an APA-style citation for each resource you plan to use in your literature review. Follow the citation with a brief two- or three-sentence description of the resource.
Write a literature review outline. Once you have an idea of the organization of themes or topics of the articles in your research area, organize those themes in a way that seems meaningful as the main points in the outline. Create a header for each theme, and place the appropriate resource citation(s) with its description under it as a sub-point to the relevant theme. You can use sub-themes if needed.
This literature review or annotated bibliography will become part of your final project proposal. In the literature review section of your proposal, you will be expected to include at least ten sources. By that point in your research, you will likely replace some of the resources in your literature review as you become more familiar with the material.Note: Textbooks and Wikipedia are not appropriate sources to refer to in your review. Use other respected resources.

Criteria Non-performance Basic Proficient Distinguished
Organize researched literature to develop the literature review outline.
Does not identify researched literature to develop the literature review outline. Identifies researched literature to develop the literature review outline. Organizes researched literature to develop the literature review outline. Analyzes researched literature to develop the literature review outline.
Provide sources that clearly support the premise of the project.
Does not provide sources that clearly support the premise of the project. Provides an incomplete list of sources, or sources do not fully support the premise of the project. Provides sources that clearly support the premise of the project. Provides sources that clearly support the premise of the project, accompanied by a detailed explanation regarding their applicability to the identified issue.
Uphold academic ethical standards by properly citing, referencing, and paraphrasing sources in APA format.
Does not uphold academic ethical standards by properly citing, referencing, and paraphrasing sources in APA format. Upholds academic ethical standards inconsistently when citing, referencing, and paraphrasing sources in APA format. Upholds academic ethical standards by properly citing, referencing, and paraphrasing sources in APA format. Upholds academic ethical standards by properly citing, referencing, and paraphrasing sources in APA format. Shows expert knowledge of APA format and style.
Communicate in a manner that is professional and consistent with expectations for members of the IT profession.
Does not communicate in a manner that is professional and consistent with expectations for members of the IT profession. Communicates in a manner that is at a graduate level and consistent with expectations for members of the IT profession. Communicates in a manner that is professional and consistent with expectations for members of the IT profession. Demonstrates advanced levels of communication that are scholarly, professional, and consistent with expectations for members of the IT profession.
requirements
school research school review description 1 pages, Double Spacing